Support Local Fish Markets

  Ahi poke sold at a dozen grocery stores and eateries on Oahu may have been contaminated with Hepatitis A, the state Health Department announced Tuesday. This is the second time in a years span where our seafood has been contaminated.

  The DOH said frozen raw ahi cubes imported to the state from Indonesia by Tropic Fish Hawaii recently tested positive for the disease. The raw ahi, which is being recalled, was used to prepare poke sold between April 27 to May 1 at several locations on Oahu. Times Supermarkets and Shima’s Supermarket locations in Aiea, Kailua, Kaneohe, Kunia, Liliha, Mililani, Waipahu and Waimanalo. It was also served or sold at GP Hawaiian Food Catering, the Da Crawfish and Crab Shack in Kapolei, Aloha Sushi near Honolulu International Airport, and the ABC Stores outlet at 205 Lewers St. in Waikiki. 

 The department said the product is being voluntarily recalled, and decontamination procedures are being conducted at all affected facilities. This is a good thing and to all the residents and visitors of Oahu, if you may have eaten any ahi from any of these eateries, it is highly suggested you contact your doctor and possibly consider getting the HEP A vaccine.

  This gets me thinking about that fact that we live on an island surrounded by the greatest ocean in the world filled with a variety of fish & sea life yet we still decide to import sea foods from other piers. Why are we importing ahi from Indonesia? What is a “local” company if they are not using local resources? 

  Not all fish eateries on the islands follow this practice though. There is a wide variety of local fish markets that offer locally caught fish & seafood. 

  For example, “Fresh Catch” located in Kaneohe and Waialae is a local seafood and meat deli that offers a variety of island-style dishes caught and prepared domestically (hence the name “Fresh Catch”).

Supporting locally caught fish markets and eateries will encourage local businesses to continue this practice and hopefully minimize the importation of fish & seafoods. When the community supports local business; local business can support the community.

 

Ocean Aid 2017

  This past Sunday at the Waikiki Shell, the Ocean Aid Festival took place. An amazing event determined to spread awareness and encourage communities to take action in the fight to protect our oceans ecosystems and more.

  The main attraction was a plethora of Grammy Award winning musical artists from around the globe. Headlining artist Ceelo Green, supported by Bootsy Collins, Maxi Priest, Ohio Players, Fishbone, DJ Lethal, DJ Mateo, DJ Big Daddy Carlos as well as top island talent Henry Kapono, Ron Artis II, Ekolu Kalama had the evening filled with fun and excitement.

  Ocean Aid transformed the entire Waikiki Shell grounds into an island utopia, featuring cultural performances, visual lighting exhibits from “Event Horizons” and top artists from the nation overseeing interactive “Wyland Galleries Wonder Walls” painted by festival goers. There was Polynesian cultural Hula & Haka dance performances, WWE Hall of Fame Rikishi & The Samoan Dynasty charity wrestling exhibition, Hawai’i’s leading culinary expert Chef Chai & much more!

There was open forum lectures from leading professors, scientists, humanitarians and ambassadors highlighting the issue of plastic garbage and marine debris that cumulates on our coastlines and open ocean gyres. The North Pacific Garbage Patch, less than 1000 miles from Hawai’i is the largest cumulation of plastic soup and marine debris that is attracted to the five major gyres of the world. Plastic and marine debris

The North Pacific Garbage Patch, less than 1000 miles from Hawai’i is the largest cumulation of plastic soup and marine debris that is attracted to the five major gyres of the world. Plastic and marine debris is kse.illing wildlife and detrimentally effecting our oceanic ecosystem. This directly affects Hawai’i our people and the rest of the world.

Visit http://www.oceanaidfestival.com/ for more information on how you can be a part of the cause.